Monday, May 24, 2010

Bean there, done that.

I spent some time at the family garden yesterday and I noticed that the purple podded pole beans are finally making an appearance. This is the first year I have tried growing them so I'm excited to see what they look and taste like.

We had a freeze warning in effect for our area last week and I was pretty worried about both the beans and the 500 baby corn plants that recently sprouted. I kept waking up in the night checking the temperature...(I know....lots of good worrying does) and we did have a hard freeze but luckily my dad got the sprinklers turned on the crops right away and all of our plants survived! Sheesh...with all that work I would have been so very sad to start over....but such is the life of a gardener....especially in North Idaho where it actually snowed on the 4th of July once..... I have made the mistake of planting too early before and as a result we lost several plants...I remember it was one year in early June and we got a freak freeze....we lost all of our cucumbers...that was not a good day....luckily I always go overboard on growing plants because we had enough left in the greenhouse to make up for our losses.
I won't plant the more vulnerable crops until the first or second week in June even though they are fairly hardened up. The tomatoes, cukes, squash, and peppers are all safe and sound in the greenhouse for a couple more weeks...although it is getting to be a bit of a jungle in there. Lol!

I will leave you with a few pictures on how the garden and the plants are shaping up:








15 comments:

  1. Quick thinking on your dad's part. Snow in July? Are you at a much higher altitude than the rest of us?

    Glad to see your beans are germinating. I"m cursing mine at the moment.

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  2. I've had terrible luck with beans and corn this year. I lost my first set to seedcorn maggots and I'm hoping my second set comes up soon.

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  3. Everything looks great! I can't believe you have those tomatoes on those plants without even putting them into the ground! Do your plants deal with a lot of transplant shock with you finally do put them into the ground?

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  4. Thomas, I know...dad to the rescue! ...although all but one of his hoses and faucets were froze...yikes! As for the snow in July....it must have been a freak El nino thing lol! I think we are at 2200 ft.

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  5. Rachel, losing any plant is a real bummer...especially to bugs! Good luck on the second batch : )

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  6. Thanks Megan...I started those tomatoes in late January...they are a patio variety so maybe that's why they produced so soon. I always transplant either early in the day or late afternoon and that seems to minimize any transplant shock.

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  7. Thank you Ribbit! I must say, I feel like a slacker lately....I have been so busy I have not had much time to visit my fellow bloggers...I think the farmer's market was more than I had anticipated. I am determined to catch up though : )

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  8. Things are really getting underway. All the tomato starts look really healthy & green!

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  9. Bent, still can't add you on FB. Please look me up. I became a fan of this site.

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  10. Will Do KaleJ, I am having trouble accessing friends on the fan page from work. I'll look you up and freind you when I get home this evening...

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  12. Oh! Are those chives I spy in there?

    I planted some of my seeds WAY too early, I won't even tell you when because it is just sad, but my basil is only this week beginning to get past its initial sprout. We've had a couple late cold days and I was freaking out.

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  13. Dietplaid, yep, those are chives... I started most of my basil indoors under grow lights starting in February and didn't put them in the greenhouse until the end of March...basil does not like the cold that's for sure : ) I wish it would stay warm now...

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